Susquehanna River

go down to the levee

Everyone in the Wyoming Valley in northeastern Pennsylvania enjoys the levee. Herman and Muriel exercise there daily.

They ride their bicycles along the path, where distance is measured by the quarter mile.

“Isn’t that a perfect view of the Susquehanna?”, she asked.

Her husband nodded assent, busily taking pictures of the perfect landscape, with its rolling verdant hills.

“It’s so nice to live a simple lifestyle,” she reminded him. “Like modern Luddites.”

Eventually they drove off, in their gas-guzzler, to Angelo’s Pizzeria in the Midway Shopping Center, for pizza and calzones.

“We’re simple,” he intoned. “But not fanatically so.”

Peter Abbey provided this week’s photo prompt for Friday Fictioneers. Rochelle Wisoff~Fields leads us weekly. It’s her fourth anniversary as our fearless leader.

Annunci

wanderlust

Light out Wanderlust. Head us out to sea.   My brother in law Steve and cousin Mark own a yacht together. Ever since around my twelfth birthday I’ve always lived within walking distance to a significant body of water. Except for my seven and a half years in northeastern Pennsylvania, where I lived down the street from the Susquehanna River, I’ve always lived by salt water canals and a  bay that leads to the Atlantic Ocean.  Although I don’t ordinarily spend a lot of time specifically on boats or at the beach, or in immediate proximity to any of the water, it’s always been quite interesting and enjoyable for me.  Because of my always having been a bookworm I can see lots of significant symbolism in water.   From Noah’s Ark to “Moby Dick” mankind has always been inextricably linked to this extremely important reality of life, and has always referred to it significantly in story telling.   From the point of view of wanderlust its appeal can easily be found in the significance of what lies out there beyond all that man’s eye can see. A horizon can be both frustrating and intimidating.  Many things in life can be elusive and deceptive. Once someone reaches what is currently his horizon, it’s not there anymore.  It’s all relative to his current circumstances.  That’s why wanderlust can  be a frustrating problem, never to be satisfied.  

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/opening-lines/

http://lindaswritingblog.wordpress.com/2014/08/23/storm-clouds/

http://mostlytruestoriesofkrenaep.com/2014/08/23/songcovers/

http://flippyzipflop.wordpress.com/2014/08/23/um-cant-i-go-back-a-little-further/

 

the week in review

The past week has been very good but quite uneventful.    I see absolutely no reason whatsoever to be even the least bit afraid to relive it, but there’s no reason to be insatiably interested in going back to it either.   I’m simply enjoying all the nice summer heat.    I only got a slight headache one day so I could most certainly do without that.    Bridget and Sam are constantly playing music full blast unfortunately on their stereos, and he even plays his guitar too loud.   That’s always a major problem during the course of any week around here anyway.    Perhaps I should have gone to the beach, right down the street, a bit more frequently.   Sam said that he’ll never been able to get over the fact that I’ve lived so close to water-Long Island’s canals and South Bay, and the Susquehanna River in northeastern Pennsylvania-ever since I was  twelve years old and I haven’t been absolutely constantly at the beach.    I’m most certainly quite happy, of course, that the past week has brought with it no major trouble for me.    The minor annoyances have been harmless and I haven’t been in any trouble.    I’ve been trying yet again to figure out James Joyce’s “Ulysses” because Bloomsday was a few days ago.     Although I should really like to see many weeks that are quite similar to this past week, there’s absolutely no reason whatsoever to zero in on this one specifically.

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/groundhog-week/

http://underthemonkeytree.com/2014/06/24/daily-prompt-groundhog-week/

http://tuckedintoacorner.wordpress.com/2014/06/24/reliving-time/

http://dragoneystory.wordpress.com/2014/06/24/just-one-more-night/

hot fun in the summertime

It’s so hard to believe right now, but summer will soon be upon us, and I’m truly looking forward to it.    I simply can’t stand cold weather.   Although I don’t, so far, have any specific plans, I shall be so happy just basking in the warmth of the sunshine.   Ever since I was twelve years old I’ve always lived very close to water.   Long Beach is well known for its beaches.   I can take a half-mile walk down Lincoln Boulevard each day,  and go to the beach.   Even if I don’t go into the water, the boardwalk can provide me with quite an amazingly impressive view.    In Wyoming I lived very close to the Susquehanna River, and it was very quiet and very enjoyable, with such fine scenery.   In Lindenhurst I was right across the street from a few nice canals.   They were also known for being so epecially picturesque.    Since I’m still fairly new to Long Beach, and quite unfamiliar with it, the summer months will give me quite a nice opportunity to get out and to travel more throughout the city.   Although I shall absolutely dread the traffic congestion because of all the  people on vacation, it will all be worth it.    I was always quite involved with my parishes in Queens, Lindenhurst and the Wyomings so now I can take advantage of the warm weather out here to start getting really busy with St. Mary of the Isle too.   Maybe I shall go to northeastern Pennsylvania to summer-time-to see my father’s relatives for the long Fourth of July weekend.   Perhaps then I can relive our infamous blueberry picking fiasco of yore.   I’ve been doing so much walking lately anyway.   Out there, especially in the nearby Poconos, I shall be able to do a lot more walking because there are a lot more wide open spaces.   Besides all the fattening food and crowds on the Independence Day weekend, the main thing I may have a bit too much of a problem with will be the sunburn.   Because I’m a bit pale complected the sun, if I’m not very careful, can take quite a toll on me, mostly if I spend a significant amount of time either in a pool or at a beach.    Over the course of the past eight years in the Wyomings I got a chance to meet a lot of people and to make quite a few friends.    I can even visit them too.    Most certainly I shall have to visit my mother’s relatives.  I’ll say hello to Uncle Frankie and Fran, and all of Aunt Lauren’s family.    If things really work out well I can even take a few trips to Jackson Heights and Lindenhurst to visit my old stomping grounds.    Most importantly of all the weather will be warm.   All I really want now is to have as much sunshine as possible.   Unfortunately it will be my first summer since my parent’s deaths.    I shall have to get used to each set of circumstances, as it comes up, without them.    That will be the only seriously sad thing.   As much as I dislike change, it’s an ongoing inevitable occurrence.     Both good and bad keep happening.    Instead of complaining, I can consider my first Long Beach summer as yet another lopsided adventure.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/04/06/daily-prompt-in-the-summertime/

http://www.blogher.com/nablopomo-april-2014-prompts

Wyoming Pa.

8thStreetBridge_02112010_05It occurred to me that because I’ve been visiting my sister’s family in the City of Long Beach, New York, for so long, I should maybe write about life in Long Beach.   Officially I’m still a resident of the Borough of Wyoming, Pennsylvania, though.    I’ve gotten to know Wyoming quite well by now having lived there since April of 2006 and I still don’t know all that much about Long Beach.    My parents were both from northeastern Pennsylvania and I’d visited the region quite regularly since my earliest childhood, until moving there a while ago.  I’ve always really enjoyed the Wyomings.   It’s an exceptionally picturesque region with extremely nice scenery.     Wyoming and West Wyoming-they share a common zip code, 18644-are such an exceptionally nice little suburban region.   There are a lot of local businesses, including stores, restaurants, doctors, hospitals and lawyers, within driving and even walking distance of my neighborhood.   They have an exceptionally nice mall only six miles away.     The borough is very close to both Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.   In northeastern Pennsylvania there are churches-Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox-all over the place.   There are many towns in the region that literally have several churches on each street.   I’d always been quite involved with Our Lady of Sorrows on Eighth Street, and St. Joseph’s on Sixth Street.   The parish is now known as St. Monica’s.    The churches, along with all the equally prominent secular organizations, contribute a lot to helping the poor, and to making things run smoothly in general.    Having met quite a few exceptionally good people in and around the Wyomings I know that the borough’s residents are as good as any I’ve ever met although they can also be as offbeat a bunch of characters as one could expect.   Considering that it’s the kind of small town where everyone knows other people’s business there’s the problem of too much gossip.     On special occasions the borough’s representatives have parades and other events to commemorate whichever milestone is referred to.    Jimmy Carter, the thirty-ninth President of the United States, even visited the Wyoming Monument, a landmark from the U.S. Revolutionary War.   He was only the third United States President, besides Rutherford B. Hayes and Theodore Roosevelt, to visit the monument.   There are also a few drawbacks to life in the Wyomings, though.    Northeastern Pennsylvania is a very mountainous region and winters are inevitably bitter cold with a seemingly endless supply of snow, rain and ice.  Driving in bad weather is treacherous.   Flooding isn’t so bad in the Wyomings but when it happens the surrounding boroughs are subject to quite a significant amount of damage.   Because it’s so close to the Susquehanna River, fog is quie a major problem too.  Because there are countless potholes in the roads driving even under the nicest circumstances is quite a chore.   Wyoming Avenue and other roads have a lot of traffic congestion.    Because of their history of coal mines, northeastern Pennsylvania typically has a higher than average percentage of deaths attributed to cancer.   There is a lot of radon, as well as other carcinogens in the environment.   Luzerne County in general is politically very corrupt.   If I were the mayor of the Wyomings I should be determined to make the Wyomings as safe as possible from any excessive damage from flooding.   I should also want to get something done about the potholes and traffic congestion, and to invest as much as possible into affordable health care.    The wear and tear on people’s vehicles is an absolute nightmare.   In spite of all the relatively minor inevitable drawbacks and inconveniences the Boroughs of Wyoming and  West Wyoming are quite an interesting likable environment.