politics

the perils of religion and politics

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Polite Company.”

Logically, in our type of free society, the ability and right to discuss religion and politics should, by definition, be presupposed. Unfortunately, however, such topics have always led to much bitterness and vitriol. We are now living in a country where bitterness and resentment always seem to abound in discourse. As far as I’m concerned I’ve always quite enjoyed a nice polite debate. Because, however, so many people are so entirely polarized, it’s quite impossible for anyone to have anything to say, no matter how reasonable or how intelligently thought out, without his being automatically accused of being either racist, anti-semitic, a hypocrite, or in violation of some other liberal pseudo-civil right. A couple of weeks ago, I expressed my belief about homosexuality on Facebook. Someone on my friend list accused me of being in violation of a most flagrant liberal obsession. When I explained to him that I have no major objection to the Tea Party, and that I may even vote for Ted Cruz, he immediately left my friend list. My niece and her friends just went on their high school’s senior class trip to Puerto Rico. When she got home she explained that they got into trouble, and accused of being racists, merely because they referred to a black policeman as black. Each time I read the comments on Youtube or some other internet site, I see a bottomless pit of accusations of racism, anti-semitism, hypocrisy and all kinds of other things, merely because someone had the nerve to contradict a cherished obsession. Lately I’ve been reading two books about anarchism. Like liberalism and socialism, it’s a worldview that demands acceptance from others, and refuse to treat them with respect in return. There’s something awfully seriously wrong with people these days. http://theflavoredword.com/2015/04/21/calling-all-mad-hatters-speak-up-and-speak-your-truth/
https://theyyouandme.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/humanity-haiku/
https://thelonerose.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/writing-for-me/
https://nicholacmassey.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/polite-company/

toora loora loora

rachel-bjerke

Of all our relatives, Uncle Jimmy has always been the most obsessed with our Irish ethnic background. This St. Patrick’s Day he explained to us all about how our patron saint chased the snakes-pagans and Druids-out of Ireland.

“Eventually,” he said, “we were confronted with those other snakes, the English and Protestants.”

Not surprisingly, he gave each of us kids a biography of Eamon de Valera and one of Michael Collins.

He’s like an Irish version of Michael Constantine in “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”.

the travails of a daily blogger

Over the course of the past full year, I’ve been able to post virtually daily to my blog. It’s only been for about the past week, since I got a case of pinkeye and bronchitis, that I’ve been cheating a little. During  the time I spent writing daily posts on WordPress, I learned that it’s hard for a blogger, no matter how frequently he posts, to build up a significant following. I also found out that a wide variety of people online can be counted on to be just as outspoken about their ideas, however eccentric and controversial they may be, as the people I’ve met in person.  Blogging regularly has given me an insight into how many different points of view there are about religion, politics, history, pop culture and anything else that can possibly be referred to. It’s so difficult to come up with fresh new ideas each day to write about. A daily blog gives me a significant chance to hone my writing skills and to remain as articulate and as well informed as possible about things.  There’s a major danger, though, with all the amateur opinions available, of missing out on a chance to get a legitimate understanding of things. The news media, of course, always tend to distort things anyway. Although blogging can be quite an exceptionally interesting experience it also leads to the risk of predictability. I try to avoid platitudes, repetition and other bad habits. It pays to be articulate.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/winning-streak/

http://unbolt.wordpress.com/2014/10/05/a-doll/

http://tombalistreri.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/one-day-lost/

http://oh3za.com/2014/11/30/winning-streak/

http://trablogger.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/canon-love/

http://parkinkspot.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/happy-one-month/

http://somnivision.com/2014/11/30/photography-wrap-up/

happy being a square

Over the course of my lifetime I’ve always been a bit of a square, never trusting the new and unknown. I usually tell people that it all started around my twelfth birthday when I was forced to move to Lindenhurst from Jackson Heights. That was my first confrontation with significant change. I’ve always been resistant to change though.  The Beatles have been my favorite band for as long as I can even remember. I have always astonished people with my lack of interest in new pop cultural milestones. Politics, of course, is entirely too important a priority to allow novelty to become a significant factor. I’ve always seriously suspected that the most controlling people use the supposed need for change-always, conveniently, change of their choosing-as a way of winning people over to their side. I’m quite happy the way I am and see no need to be on the vanguard of a new experience.  It doesn’t pay to bother to go too crazy for new experiences. Everything new and fresh inevitably soon becomes old and stale anyway. If someone becomes too attached to the new for its own sake, he then goes through his lifetime perpetually frustrated.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/avant-garde/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/couriers/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/commute/

http://onesahmscrazylife.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/kids-these-days/

http://agirllikemee.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/bubbles-of-my-mind/

http://marthakennedy.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/music/

Obama

Dear Barack Obama,  Martin Luther King Jr. once looked “…to a day when people will not be judged  by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”  That’s exactly what most certainly did not happen in the 2008 and 2012 elections. People stooped to voting for you only because you’re black. You’re not even entirely black anyway. Voting for someone simply because he’s black is precisely as unethical as voting for him just because he’s white. You’re in favor of abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, reverse discrimination and all the rest of the liberal agenda.  How could anyone with your ideas possibly be even the least bit worthy of the presidency or the Nobel Peace Prize.  You once claimed that you wouldn’t want either of your daughters to be punished with a baby just because of her having made a mistake, as if having a baby is a bad thing. You’re a follower of characters like Saul Alinsky, who wholeheartedly advocated the abandonment of morals and ethics as impediments to political success. Alinsky’s book, “Rules For Radicals” is dedicated to Lucifer.  Most recently you showed the United States military absolutely no respect whatsoever by expecting them to hold your umbrella, and by saluting them with a coffee cup. This letter is only a very brief synopsis of the reasons I could never condone your being President.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/make-it-count/

http://crashcoursedummy.wordpress.com/2014/09/14/war/

http://debooworks.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/miss-you/

http://threepsandq.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/prompt-pandemic/

http://closetoeighty.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/message-to-god/

http://yzhengblog.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/some-truthful-answers-please/

the classic literary fairy

I’ve always been quite a literary snob.   Although I realize that every pop cultural figure, ranging from Joan Collins’s sister Jackie to Suzanne Sommers, and people from the casts of television shows like “Friends”, thinks he’s a writer, I inevitably restrict my reading material to the works of people like Dostoyevsky and Jane Austen, Flannery O’Connor and Walker Percy, and all the other highbrow literary figures.     Were I ever confronted with a literary fairy, who could give me the ability to become either an obscure novelist, whose work would be admired and studied by a small cult following for generations yet to come, or a popular paperback author whose works could provide immediate enjoyment to millions in the short term, I should choose to be a serious author.  There’s nothing wrong with writing harmless fluff with no literary merit.   I’ve simply always admired important literature and wished that I were capable of writing something truly profound and noteworthy.   I don’t like having to be bothered with keeping up with trends, though several trends, throughout the past few generations, have most certainly caught my attention quite favorably.    Great literature, like all the other disciplines in the humanities department, deals with human nature and a good author has to have the ability to have a lot of insight into history, psychology, philosophy and all other disciplines.    If I were ever lucky enough to be a serious writer, I should make sure I should steer clear of all liberal ideas.   Story telling is extremely important and the conservative voice has to be heard.     That’s why I’ve always liked both music and literature.     Politics, history, economics and other disciplines have their place in society but people tend to be more prone toward accepting ideas by way of the narrative approach rather than didactic.    I should think that maybe I could be a serious intelligent alternative to the kind of pablum that comes from writers like J. K. Rowling.    Even if my work would be admired and studied by only few people, as the object of a cult following, I should be quite happy with that, as long as I could write exceptionally good literature.    That would be especially appropriate for someone like me, considering that I’ve always been quite a distinctive character who can be counted on to appeal only to people with seriously offbeat tastes and ideas anyway.   I’ve always enjoyed Emily Dickinson’s idea, that one should “Tell all the truth but tell it slant.”    Symbolism, an important ingredient in all literature, plays quite an exceptionally large role in my world.   Since I’ve never felt particularly comfortable in the company of strangers, I should have to be the kind of writer who would remain aloof from his readership.    Frequent interviews and constant attention would be quite a burden for me to have to contend with.    If anyone is interested in finding out about the other worlds that come from my imagination, though, he’d better most certainly beware of all the twists and turns they contain.   Some of them can be awfully seriously disturbing.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/a-bookish-choice/

http://likereadingontrains.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/i-am-the-obscure-daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://tnkerr.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://joantatley.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/literary-witching/

crisis management

Of course unlike Rahm Emanuel I’m not part of the corrupt Chicago political machine but I  can imagine that the line about not letting a crisis go to waste can be true in a legitimate sense too.    Each of us should be quite capable of learning not merely from his mistakes, misdeeds and setbacks but from all kinds of bad circumstances in general.  Even though no one should ever even think of taking any kind of inappropriate advantage of a crisis, either financially or otherwise, there’s always something that can be learned from each experience.    I can’t remember having turned any sort of crisis into an opportunity to accrue some kind of advantage, either financially or otherwise.   It’s always quite a good idea for each of us to examine all the specific circumstances that are relevant to each particular crisis and to make sure that he learns how to avoid taking any unnecessary risks from then on.    Each individual should pay very strict attention to any crisis that transpires in order to ascertain whether it was the result of problems with either timing, health, spending money or some other kind of trouble.   From then on he can avoid, to the best of his ability, falling into the same traps.

 

 

http://www.blogher.com/nablopomo-april-2014-prompts

life’s been good to me so far

Fortunately I’ve never been involved with anyone I shouldn’t have been mixed up with.   I can understand how taxing that kind of relationship can be.   Imagine all the incessant arguing because of such a  total lack of compatibility.  Such an experience must be quite a nightmare.   Whether it’s for reasons of either a religious or political nature, or for some other kind of circumstances, that’s bound to lead to some seriously nasty consequences, especially in today’s era of victim status where so many self-pitying, self-aggrandizing creeps are encouraged to demand all kinds of entirely blind sycophantic obedience.   At least I’ve been spared, however obnoxious my life has been, such a horrendous ordeal.

 

 

http://www.blogher.com/nablopomo-april-2014-prompts

Wyoming Pa.

8thStreetBridge_02112010_05It occurred to me that because I’ve been visiting my sister’s family in the City of Long Beach, New York, for so long, I should maybe write about life in Long Beach.   Officially I’m still a resident of the Borough of Wyoming, Pennsylvania, though.    I’ve gotten to know Wyoming quite well by now having lived there since April of 2006 and I still don’t know all that much about Long Beach.    My parents were both from northeastern Pennsylvania and I’d visited the region quite regularly since my earliest childhood, until moving there a while ago.  I’ve always really enjoyed the Wyomings.   It’s an exceptionally picturesque region with extremely nice scenery.     Wyoming and West Wyoming-they share a common zip code, 18644-are such an exceptionally nice little suburban region.   There are a lot of local businesses, including stores, restaurants, doctors, hospitals and lawyers, within driving and even walking distance of my neighborhood.   They have an exceptionally nice mall only six miles away.     The borough is very close to both Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.   In northeastern Pennsylvania there are churches-Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox-all over the place.   There are many towns in the region that literally have several churches on each street.   I’d always been quite involved with Our Lady of Sorrows on Eighth Street, and St. Joseph’s on Sixth Street.   The parish is now known as St. Monica’s.    The churches, along with all the equally prominent secular organizations, contribute a lot to helping the poor, and to making things run smoothly in general.    Having met quite a few exceptionally good people in and around the Wyomings I know that the borough’s residents are as good as any I’ve ever met although they can also be as offbeat a bunch of characters as one could expect.   Considering that it’s the kind of small town where everyone knows other people’s business there’s the problem of too much gossip.     On special occasions the borough’s representatives have parades and other events to commemorate whichever milestone is referred to.    Jimmy Carter, the thirty-ninth President of the United States, even visited the Wyoming Monument, a landmark from the U.S. Revolutionary War.   He was only the third United States President, besides Rutherford B. Hayes and Theodore Roosevelt, to visit the monument.   There are also a few drawbacks to life in the Wyomings, though.    Northeastern Pennsylvania is a very mountainous region and winters are inevitably bitter cold with a seemingly endless supply of snow, rain and ice.  Driving in bad weather is treacherous.   Flooding isn’t so bad in the Wyomings but when it happens the surrounding boroughs are subject to quite a significant amount of damage.   Because it’s so close to the Susquehanna River, fog is quie a major problem too.  Because there are countless potholes in the roads driving even under the nicest circumstances is quite a chore.   Wyoming Avenue and other roads have a lot of traffic congestion.    Because of their history of coal mines, northeastern Pennsylvania typically has a higher than average percentage of deaths attributed to cancer.   There is a lot of radon, as well as other carcinogens in the environment.   Luzerne County in general is politically very corrupt.   If I were the mayor of the Wyomings I should be determined to make the Wyomings as safe as possible from any excessive damage from flooding.   I should also want to get something done about the potholes and traffic congestion, and to invest as much as possible into affordable health care.    The wear and tear on people’s vehicles is an absolute nightmare.   In spite of all the relatively minor inevitable drawbacks and inconveniences the Boroughs of Wyoming and  West Wyoming are quite an interesting likable environment.