Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish

the belle of amherst and I visit my early days

I went to Lindenhurst last night

I  thought I Heard the bells

Ring out loud at O.L.P.H.

The town was Dark and still.

I then went back to East Elmhurst

Outside St. Gabriel’s

And no one Recognized me there.

I felt a Solemn chill.

emilydickinson

“Perhaps I’ll come back Someday soon”,

I thought as I did leave.

“I don’t belong Here anymore”,

Was all I could believe.

I have there now no Friend or foe

But only Tales to tell

Of life that was once, long ago,

A world I once knew well.

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Annunci

heigh ho heigh ho it’s off to work we go

Unfortunately I’m between jobs right now.    My last two jobs were one with Citicorp Retail Services and one with the postal service in Melville and Bethpage.    I could never stand the postal job because it was so physically hard and strenuous but at least it was something.     The work was very boring and required a lot of heavy lifting.    Many of the people there were hard to get along with but that’s a part of any job.    My circumstances in Bethpage were especially difficult to handle because I was often forced to work the graveyard shift there.    Most of the people in management were at least reasonably decent and easy to get along with.    The only one who was a troublemaker was Marjorie, a surly black woman.     There was a union there but I never got significantly involved with it.   Of all the people I knew, Kevin and Anton were the most significant union officials.     The one advantage to my having worked there was that I got a chance to meet a lot of very interesting characters.    Before that I worke at Citicorp Retail Services in Farmingdale and Melville.    In the first department I was in, Sales Processing,  from the late 1980’s until the early 1990’s,  everything worked out quite well and we all got along quite well.    Sal, Carole and Yolanda were in charge.    Most people there were quite decent and good natured,      Besides the inevitable fighting and personality conflicts it was always quite a happy environment.    Then after a while  that department was eliminated.    I got moved to Customer Service.    That department was harder for me to handle because there were a lot more trouble makers there.   There were still quite a few very good people too but there were entirely too many who were genuinely bad.   Seven-DwarfsFor a while I was also a sacristan at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst.    At that job I used to have to deal with a wide variety of diocesan priests, professed Religious and parishioners every day of the week.    It was a nice part time job.     I was required to get everything ready for the daily Masses and novenas, as well as weddings, funerals and other things that were required to keep things going at the parish.    That was yet another environment where I was expected to deal with very many eccentric characters.    having lived for most of my life in Lindenhurst I really knew my way around the parish and got along quite well with most of the people.     I’ve never been a good salesman.    In the 1980’s my eighth grade history teacher tried to get me involved with Amway.    That’s a really good job for someone to have if he’s a capable salesman but I simply don’t have the aptitude for that kind of thing.    That kind of job is very good for my teacher and his wife, who’ve always been better than I at dealing with people in that way.     My cousin Gary tried to get me involved with Primerica Financial Services.     Unfortunately even though we attended all the meetings and classes, and did well on the tests we were required to take,  it didn’t work out for us.   I consider it quite a worthwhile experience though.    It’s always good to know as much as possible about insurance and the financial world.

luck of the Irish

Every time I’ve taken a chance on putting three coins into a fountain all I’ve ever gotten to show for it have been three wet rusty coins.      I don’t really believe in lucky charms or anything like that.     Behavior that leads supposedly  to either a lucky or unlucky outcome always to be more of a case of the post hoc ergo propter hoc logical fallacy anyway.    Having been prone over  the course of all my adult lifetime to anxiety and panic attacks, though, I never pass up a chance for a nice security blanket.    I’ve always been somewhat amused whenever someone claims that he wants to get involved with me in any kind of lottery, contest or something of that nature because I’m supposedly always so especially lucky with things like that.   Amazingly I’ve somehow always been unusually lucky at very minor little insignificant games of chance.    Over the years I’ve been known to win small contests and lotteries at work, school or anyplace else where people are willing to gamble.    Over twenty years ago, at my cousin Vinnie’s church in western New York, I won a football that had been used by the Buffalo Bills in a recent Super Bowl, with all their autographs on it, including Jim Kelly’s.    Since I’ve never enjoyed sports anyway it was only somewhat interesting for me.    When I was actively involved at Our Lady of Perpetual Help’s  parish and Knights of Columbus council, I won all sorts of little contests at their fund raisers.    I also frequently won minor things at St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School.    In the Scranton Diocese, all the churches in the deanery in which I lived seemed to have their annual fund raisers at about the same time.    One year  I went to about a to the annual bazaars for about a half dozen of the local parishes and won something really nice at each one.     Nobody’s life ever really changes, either for the better or worse, just because he either makes a wish, wears a particular object or article of clothing, or says or does something in order to affect a particular change of circumstances.   Such claims are all spurious.     If it makes someone feel more comfortable, though, to eat a certain food,  to wear a certain article of clothing, or to engage in some particular behavior in order better to ensure a favorable outcome, I say that as long as there’s no real serious expectation that a real connection exists, and as long as he’s just doing it in order to feel more comfortable, it’s a good idea.       rabbitfoot

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the times they are a ~changin

bangFor close to eight years I lived in the borough of Wyoming, in northeastern Pennsylvania.    It’s always struck me as such an exceptionally nice small town environment.   When my parents were alive it was quite interesting.   They were old and retired and we could always count on each other.   Uncle Frankie was less than a mile away in West Wyoming.   He’s also very old and retired.   My parents both died last autumn and Uncle Frankie now spends most of his time living with Fran in southeastern Pennsylvania.    Aunt Lauren and her family are the only other relatives I have anywhere near there and they live way over in the mountains of Harding and Dallas.    After our father’s funeral Mary Anne and Steve reminded me that I should have to be confronted with a final decision over whether to remain in Pennsylvania, where I had already made an established life and reputation, or to come to Long Beach, New York, where I could be very close to them and other family members.   I’ve ended up in Long Beach.     Over the course of most of my adult life, as when I was a kid, I’ve always been very actively involved in the churches I’ve attended.   When I moved from Lindenhurst to Wyoming, I automatically got just as active in Our Lady of Sorrows as I had been in Our Lady of Perpetual Help.   Having done so, I made quite a few really good friends.   I should suppose that now I can do the same thing in St. Mary of the Isle, Long Beach’s parish.  Making new friends has always been somewhat of an annoying experience for me.   Meeting new people in general has always made me uncomfortable.    I’m hoping to join their local Knights of Columbus council here so that I can meet a really wide variety of new people.   I’m a fourth degree member.   I shall have to start going to the nearby lay Carmelite meetings too at Our Lady of Peach Parish in Lynbrook.    I’ve never liked change or felt the least bit comfortable with it.   The first significant change I can remember is the big move from Queens to Long Island when I was twelve years old.   To this day I still refer to that time as an unbearably  traumatic experience.   Another major advantage of my being here is that now I can be much more available to visit my old schools for reunions and other functions in general.   Now that I’m back in the same general area as St. Gabriel’s in East Elmhurst and St. John the Baptist in West Islip,  it will be a lot easier to get back there to see old friends, including classmates and teachers of mine.   The best way to convince me that a change is acceptable and even enjoyable is to keep on reminding me of all that it has in common with all that I’ve already gotten really familiar with anyway.    Although many people equate the following of familiar patterns and habits with being stale and dull, I like it.   That must be at least part of the reason for the fact that the Beatles have always been my favorites since I was around four years old.     Change in a certain sense can be nice too but even then I’ve always most especially liked the kind of change that enables me to go back to things I can remember from days gone by.   Absolute cold turkey change simply isn’t for me.

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