O.L.P.H. grammar school

you know my name (look up my number)

My Name Is Larry

  1. My name is Larry. Officially I’m named Lawrence, after my mother’s father, who died in late August of 1959, slightly over two weeks before I was born.  Although I never got a chance to get to know my grandfather, I grew up constantly in touch with my Uncle Larry and my cousin Larry, on my father’s side.  Among my father’s relatives there have even been nine Joseph’s, and a bit too much repetition of other names too. Throughout the years, in order to differentiate from among us Larry’s, I was too often referred to as Little Larry, and even Baby Larry.  My niece and nephews, knowing that my full name is Lawrence, have often asked if I have ever gotten any mileage out of that variation of my name.   I remind them that under official circumstances it frequently comes up, in school, work, and anywhere else that may require me to be a bit formal.  Sister Miriam Therese, of the Sisters of Charity, was my fifth grade teacher at St. Gabriel’s in East Elmhurst. It was in her class that I was first reminded constantly that my name was Lawrence. She was quite strict about each student’s always being addressed and referred to by his first name.  Around the time of my twelfth birthday we moved from Jackson Heights to Lindenhurst. When kids in my new schools, Copiague Junior High School, and then Our Lady of Perpetual Help, asked me what my name was, I took a chance on introducing myself as Lawrence. The Copiague kids stuck with it for around the next three years. Somehow after that it faded away entirely.  In my Catholic school, though, things were a bit different. The first kid I met there was Jerry Antonacci. He asked me my name. I introduced myself as Lawrence. He then asked if he may call me Larry. I said yes and that was the end of it. Unlike certain other names, such as Anthony, David, Michael, and Peter, the name Lawrence simply doesn’t strike people as that interesting as far as always calling somebody by his full name. I see no point in ever bothering to change it. There have been times over the course of my lifetimes when it has struck me as somewhat annoying.  In general, though, it’s quite nice.

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Sparks From A Combustible Mind

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traumatic september 11

On September 11, 1971, I moved from Jackson Heights, Queens, to Lindenhurst, in Suffolk County. It was five days before my twelfth birthday and I had a difficult time adjusting to my new circumstances. Always having gone to Catholic school, at St. Gabriel’s, I was forced, for two weeks, to attend Copiague Junior High School, the local public school,until I got into Our Lady of Perpetual Help. I ended up spending many decades in Lindenhurst but my early days there were quite a quirky trip.

On September 11, 2001, five days before my forty second birthday, the Moslem terrorists attacked the World Trade Center in Manhattan, and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.,also hijacking United Airlines Flight 93. People on the left still don’t quite seem to understand that Islam is ruled by Satan. I was at 9:00 a.m. Mass that day at Our Lady of Perpetual Help when Father Edward M. Seagriff told us about the attacks.

see you in september

When I was still only a youngster, still obligated to go to school, I’d always so thoroughly enjoyed it. Although, of course, it meant having to put a stop to all the uninterrupted enjoyment of summer, going back to school in September was always quite an interesting experience.  The only time I truly let it bother me a little was at the beginning of the seventh grade, when, having moved from Jackson Heights to Lindenhurst, I was forced to spend two weeks in Copiague Junior High School, after which I went to O.L.P.H. in Lindenhurst for the rest of my time in grammar school.  That was only because they were both new to me.  Now that I’m an adult man, my feelings toward the end of the summer each year ultimately amount to mere passive resignation.  Imo’ve always been quite smitten with symbolism and autumn and winter always abound with it. The last few months of each year always  bring with them cold weather and dark gloomy skies.  For a while autumn is quite nice.   I’ve always quite enjoyed Labor Day, Halloween and Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving was especially nice when I was in the habit of visiting my cousins in North Tonawanda. Eventually, though, the last few months of the year turn into a seemingly endless succession of mandatory concessions to all sorts of inevitable trouble.   My mother died last September and my father died last November so from now on those times will also have quite a particularly sad twist to them. 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/august-blues/

http://designersophisticate.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/summer-can-be-too-long/

http://themasculinepen.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/the-learnings-of-september-now-come-early-the-daily-post/

http://debooworks.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/august-blues/

that was yesterday and yesterday’s gone

peabodyThere were several episodes of the television show “The Twilight Zone” that dealt with a character’s  traveling to a bygone era, whether before he was born-the most famous was the one about Willoughby-or to his much younger days.   Those episodes always depicted drooling over the past as a nightmarishly dysfunctional thing, characteristic of a dissatisfied overwhelmed adult who couldn’t cope with his real life.   If I could go back to an earlier part of my life, I should like to revisit any part of my school days.    Although I most certainly recognize quite well that the time I spent in school wasn’t all one long halcyon era, looking back upon it has always been quite an enjoyable experience for me.    By conventional standards I was never the least bit popular in school.    In a way I was the kind of kid who could be classified as a square.    Then, as now, I neither liked, nor was good at sports.   My sense of humor was, and still is, entirely offbeat.  When I was at St. Gabriel’s, in East Elmhurst, Queens, I was an altar boy and a member of the glee club and bowling league.   The Sisters of Charity, De La Salle Christian Brothers, and lay teachers on the faculty were quite exceptional and the kids I knew were really good too.   Then came two weeks at Copiague Junior High School, immediately followed by two years at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst.   I’ve always remembered that part of my life as my especially uncomfortable transitional time, though I enjoyed it quite a bit.   In high school, at St. John the Baptist, in West Islip, I had such a good time bluffing my way past the Dominican and Franciscan Sisters and laity on the faculty, and the kids I knew were really good too.  I was involved with the chess club and student council.   The time I spent at S.U.N.Y. Farmingdale was also quite exceptional.   The professors and students were very good people and the campus was one of the nicest looking places I’ve ever seen.    I lived in Lindenhurst all throughout my adolescence, as well as for most of my adulthood.     From the point of view of negative constructive criticism, I should like to go back as a somewhat less shy, more confident kind of character.    The neighborhoods I grew up in were quite fine too.  Jackson Heights was populated by quite a cast of colorful characters, and approximately two thirds of the people in my neighborhood were Italians who spoke only Italian, and Hispanics who spoke only Spanish.    Everybody was forced to get to know everyone there.   Lindenhurst has always been noted for its emphasis on peace and quiet.   My neighborhood there, known as the American Venice, was on a very small island that was perfect for someone like me who enjoys a relaxed environment.   In each neighborhood the business district was very close and there were very many activities available.   Everybody knows about the grandfather paradox.   It’s a condition on time travel.   Nobody can undo the very significant events of  his past, or of the past in general.   If I could go back to my past, I’d tell young Larry to loosen up a bit about all the hard parts, and that ultimately everything works out.   I’m now back in touch, on Facebook, with many people from my youthful days.   I’ve seen a lot of them in person over the course of my adult years too.    I can’t literally go back to the days of my youth but there’s no harm in sneaking a peek or two at my younger persona every once in a while.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/prompt-turn-back-time/

memories may be beautiful and yet

I’ve never made any secret of the fact that I’ve always considered September 11, 1971 quite a major watershed moment in my lifetime.    I was on the verge of turning twelve years old and had virtually always, for as long as I could remember, lived in Jackson Heights in Queens until then.     On that date my parents, Mary Anne  and I moved to Lindenhurst, two counties away in Suffolk County, in the middle of Long Island, on the south shore.     To this very day I can still remember having made up my mind, in quite a determined manner, to make it quite clear that I may have been in Lindenhurst but I would always consider myself from Jackson Heights.    Some people, upon being bombarded with such a seemingly infinite supply of  cold turkey irrevocable changes, seem to thrive on such an adventure.   I found it all entirely too nerve racking.     Upon my having said good-bye to St. Gabriel’s in East Elmhurst, I went to Copiague Junior High School for two weeks.    From then on I went to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Elementary School, in Lindenhurst, until the end of the eighth grade.     Perhaps I would always have been an excessively shy neurotic with all sorts of lopsided ways anyway, even if I would never have moved at the beginning of my adolescence.    That much change, in that short a time, didn’t help though.    Eventually by the time  I started high school, I no longer minded all the new circumstances.   The best thing about someone’s being a high school freshman is that  he’s only one among many other freshmen.    During my first two years in Lindenhurst, though, I was practically the only new kid there.   There was a girl named Cindy in my class at Our Lady of Perpetual Help, who started the same day I did, but everyone else was already an established member of the old guard.    The other most memorable moments in my life were when my parents both died, at eighty years old,  within forty five days of each other, last autumn.    In November 2012 my mother started getting very violently ill with cancer.   She was forced to spend the next ten months constantly going back and forth to Medical Oncology Associates in Kingston, the Geisinger Hospital and General Hospital in Wilkes Barre, and John Heinz Institute of Rehab in Kingston.    She died on September 23.    My father died around a month and a half later, at the Veteran’s Hospital, on November 7,  of a heart attack.  Everyone knows this brings about quite a significant change in an individual’s life.    I was forced into making  quite a lot of significant decisions and changes that would have been otherwise entirely unnecessary.   My-Name-is-Change

Because of their having lived until I was fifty four years old, their having always been around had most certainly been quite a significant part of my identity.    Their good and bad qualities, character strengths and defects are now all in the past tense.    One of the properties this had in common with the move to Lindenhurst from Jackson Heights was its irrevocable, cold turkey nature.   Surprisingly, although I’ve never dealt very well with stress, I got through all the hospital trips and both funerals fairly well.  Whatever I was supposed to do, I must have done in an acceptable manner.   What still boggles my mind is that things go on and neither of them is available anymore.     All the things that transpired between November 2012 and November 2013 are now permanently embedded into my memory.   Like a change of address this milestone marks the beginning of a new era of my life and even a new identity for me.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/prompt-moments-to-remember/

i don’t want to leave you now you know i believe and how

St_John_Baptist_Diocesan_H_School_314934 18-lasalle-schoolFor my first twelve years of school I had virtually always gone to exceptionally good Catholic schools in Queens and Long Island.    In grammar school, with the exception of two weeks in Copiague Junior High School at the beginning of the seventh grade, I went to St. Gabriel’s in East Elmhurst for six years and spent most of my last two years at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst.    After that I went to St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School in West Islip.   I’ve always really enjoyed keeping in touch with people from those days.    As Hope, one of the ladies from my class at St. John’s, once said on Facebook, just because we were classmates so long ago, doesn’t mean that we should be forbidden to try to be friends again now.    Because of my having spent all my adolescence and most of my adult life in Lindenhurst it’s always been so much easier for me to get back to St. John’s reunions than St. Gabriel’s.    During the very early days of the twenty first century I got back in touch with a few friends from Jackson Heights and I’ve been to a couple of St. Gabriel’s reunions with most of them.    My parents and I got to see a lot of my old friends and their parents and families.     The Sisters of Charity,  de la Salle Christian Brothers and lay teachers who were on the faculty and administration were there too.    I always have a really nice time at St. John’s  reunions too with all the classmates, and Dominican and Franciscan Sisters and lay teachers from the faculty and administration.   The hard part for me has always been having to say good-bye when it’s all over.   Although I understand that the food, music and other circumstances at these events are never objectively any better than they are at other parties or occasions, being back with all the people from my early days, in the same place in which we first got together,  is inevitably quite a thrill.   Over the course of the past quite a few years I’ve been in touch with very many of these people on Facebook and e mail anyway but that’s never struck me as anywhere near as interesting as seeing them in person.    It’s even better when we can get back together on the grounds of the school, though St. Gabriel’s was  recently turned into a public school.     It’s so interesting for me to be able to see how these people and places have turned out over the course of the time that’s passed since I was a kid.  I’ve always been quite smitten by the grass-is-always-greener-on-the-other-side syndrome.    At least I understand that though.    It wouldn’t be the same if I could see them in person on a regular basis again.   Then it would become a routine chore and would lose all its charm.    Each of those specific times, precisely because they’re so infrequent and so temporary,   is so very hard to let go of when it has to end.    Because I’ve always had both an overwhelmingly good imagination and an intense interest in my past I tend to get really engrossed in times like this.   The bookworm in me sees it  somewhat as if I’m  revisiting a previous chapter in my life story.    Although no one can rewrite anything like that it’s still quite nice to see how all the characters, and the settings,  have turned out.   Each of us, though, has to make sure he leaves before midnight in order to avoid turning into a pumpkin.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/daily-prompt-linger/

lefty’s left arm broke

On Wednesday,  November 13,  during the late afternoon I broke my left arm.    It’s always struck me as somewhat interesting that it happened on the grounds of my high school, St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School,  in West Islip, New York, because I was in the class of 1977.    During the late 1980’s and for most of the 1990’s I was very active in the school’s alumni association.    In 1983 my eighth grade history teacher from Our Lady of Perpetual Help Elementary School in Lindenhurst, New York, convinced me to get involved with Amway.    At one of  St. John’s alumni meetings I convinced one of the school’s long-time assistant principals, Sister Noella, to buy some Amway bubble gum remover from me for the tables and desks in the school.   She’d been on the administration for as long as anyone can remember.     During the late afternoon of that fateful Wednesday, after I had arrived home from my job at Citicorp Retail Services in Farmingdale, New York, I drove over to the school so I could deliver the  bubble gum cleaner to Sister Noella.      When I got inside the school I went over to the lobby outside the cafeteria.   Instead of patiently walking to the administration’s office, I tried to run.    Unfortunately I tripped over a bar that went across the floor,  and I fell flat upon my face.    My left arm was broken.   Within the next few minutes I walked to the administration’s office and explained to Sister William Marie about what had happened.    I then walked over to Good Samaritan Hospital, right next d00r.    I couldn’t even sign myself into the hospital because I’m left handed and my right hand is entirely incompetent when it comes to writing.    They made me scribble something anyway.   I was forced to stay in the emergency room for quite an obscenely long time without any attention.    Eventually  I was treated by Dr. Glen Arvin and his nurse Terry.    My mother, and my cousin Larry from Massapequa, arrived to take me home after I was already stupefied from all the anesthesia and other medication I was forced to take.    The next morning I explained everything on the phone to Carole, my immediate supervisor at Citicorp.      My shoulder and elbow were broken.   Because of the gravity of that kind of a break everyone took it for granted that I would inevitably require both an operation and a lot of physical therapy.    Throughout the next few months I couldn’t drive and I was subjected to a lot of extra boredom and annoyance.    I tried to learn to write with my right hand but that led to nothing but trouble and frustration.    With lots of help from other people, though, I got through it all quite well.   I never needed physical therapy or an operation.    I went to a physician’s assistant a few times for check-ups.  When the big day finally came, and my father drove me to the physician’s assistant one last time to have my cast taken off,  I practically passed out because of the weird sensation I was subjected to when it was first removed.   Other than that, though,  most of the immediate aftermath of my broken arm was only  relatively minor.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/04/daily-prompt-against-all-odds/

FATHER’S DAY

Yesterday was Father’s Day.   On Saturday afternoon Mary Anne, Steve &  Bridget, along with their dog, surprised my parents by showing up & staying overnight.  Steve, being Steve, got my mother, Bridget & me to go to Jitty Joe’s in Moosic with him for ice c ream.  I got a bowl of praline ice cream.    Early yesterday we all went to Perkins, on Rte 315 in Dupont, for a really nice breakfast.   They were forced to leave early to pick up Sam at the airport.  He was in Florida visiting his other grandmother.   Michael & Erin were visiting her parents.    Uncle Frankie has been visiting Fran for the past few days so I go to his house regularly to pick up his mail.   I’m in the habit of attending 8:30 Mass each Sunday morning at St. Joseph’s on Sixth Street but yesterday I went to 11:00 Mass at O.L. Sorrows. After Mass, when I stopped at Unimart on Wyoming Avenue, I ran into Gino, Michelle & the kids outside the store.   On Saturday morning I attended our monthly Lay Carmelite meeting on South Meade Street in Wilkes_Barre.  We meet at the Little Flower Manor on the third Saturday morning of each monthe.  We welcome new people who are interested in joining.   Sister Mary Robert wasn’t available but Msgr. Grimaglia was with us.   Unfortunately, O.L.P.H., my old grammar school on Wellwood Avenue in Lindenhurst, N.Y., is now closed permanently.  On the bright side, Msgr. Bob Brennan, an alumnus of  both O.L.P.H. & St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School in West Islip, N.Y. , has recently been named an auxiliary bishop in the Rockville Centre Diocese.  Today is Beatle Paul McCartney’s seventieth birthday.   We hall hope he has such an especially fab time.

MEMORIAL DAY AND BIRTHDAYS~

Today wood

Today would have been the ninety~fifth birthday of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, thirty~fifth president of the United States.    Kennedy was the United States’  first Catholic president.  He was also the youngest man ever elected to the office.    He was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963.    His was the fourth presidential assassination.    Today is also Burt Koza’s birthday.   He was my eighth grade history teacher at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst, New York.    My niece Bridget’s birthday was on the 27th.   She’s fifteen.   My parents & I talked to her on the phone for practically a half hour.    My cousin Gino’s  birthday was on the 25th.   My parents, Uncle Frankie & I all went over to his party on Saturday afternoon at around 4:00.    Besides him, Michelle & their three kids,  Aunt Helen,  Michelle’s both parents & her family, as well as friends of theirs were there.    My parents were the first to leave.    Uncle Frankie left a few hours later.   He only lives two doors away from Gino.  I left very late at night.   A splendid time was had by one & all.   I only drank two beers, Miller Lite, & a cup of Captain Morgan rum & Coke.    Because of that Gino made me let him drive me home.   His father~in~law followed us.   Yesterday after 8:00 a.m. Mass at O.L. Sorrows I got ready to go to the big annual parade we always have in the Wyomings for Memorial Day.  Gino & his son Eric marched in the parade with Eric’s Cub (B0y?)  Scout troop.  I was a bit surprised, on two separate occasions, when a couple of people said hello to me by name .    I didn’t recognize either of them.   It was a really nice time.    The parade went from Shoemaker Avenue in West Wyoming down Eighth Street & into Exeter by way of Wyoming Avenue.