Melville N.Y.

elvinko and katie pie

For many years I worked at Citicorp Retail Services, first on Route 109 in Farmingdale, New York, and then on Old Country Road in Melville, New York.   I can honestly say that most people I met there were quite decent and likable, but there were a view notable exceptions.   The last department I worked in, up until the time they closed down, was the customer service department.   In general the people there were very good and easy to work with.   There were a couple of characters, though, who made everyone miserable.    One was a devious Puerto Rican guy named Elvys (Elvinko).   The other was a mean little blonde named Gayle (Katie Pie).    As far as I was concerned Elvinko and Katie Pie were the veritable bane of everyone’s existence.   They were constantly gossiping and insulting people.   They messed things up and then blamed others, and were quite determined to tell the supervisors and managers about the slightest of missteps from anyone they didn’t like, thereby ensuring that people got into quite a lot of entirely unnecessary trouble.   Elvinko and Katie Pie, from the first instant they set foot onto the grounds of the company,  provoked dissent among people there.   They most certainly brought out the very worst in me.   I really should have explained to the supervisors and managers, with proof, exactly how rotten they really were.   I should have exposed their filthy disgusting mouths, the way they lied, gossiped and turned people against each other.     Their anti social behavior was directed toward a significant enough number of people that it would have been very easy to get many victims of their abuse to back me up.    If enough people would have spoken up against these monsters, we could have avoided quite a whole lot of trouble.   Unfortunately, though, most people just dealt with them in entirely unofficial ways.   The problem with my having to associate with someone of their ilk is that under those circumstances, I’ve always tended to fight fire with fire, because someone that irremediably rotten and self absorbed never even so much as thinks of listening to the voice of rightly ordered reason anyway.

 

 

 

 

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/break-the-silence/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/alert/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/chameleon/

http://suzie81speaks.com/2014/05/25/no-means-no/

Annunci

heigh ho heigh ho it’s off to work we go

Unfortunately I’m between jobs right now.    My last two jobs were one with Citicorp Retail Services and one with the postal service in Melville and Bethpage.    I could never stand the postal job because it was so physically hard and strenuous but at least it was something.     The work was very boring and required a lot of heavy lifting.    Many of the people there were hard to get along with but that’s a part of any job.    My circumstances in Bethpage were especially difficult to handle because I was often forced to work the graveyard shift there.    Most of the people in management were at least reasonably decent and easy to get along with.    The only one who was a troublemaker was Marjorie, a surly black woman.     There was a union there but I never got significantly involved with it.   Of all the people I knew, Kevin and Anton were the most significant union officials.     The one advantage to my having worked there was that I got a chance to meet a lot of very interesting characters.    Before that I worke at Citicorp Retail Services in Farmingdale and Melville.    In the first department I was in, Sales Processing,  from the late 1980’s until the early 1990’s,  everything worked out quite well and we all got along quite well.    Sal, Carole and Yolanda were in charge.    Most people there were quite decent and good natured,      Besides the inevitable fighting and personality conflicts it was always quite a happy environment.    Then after a while  that department was eliminated.    I got moved to Customer Service.    That department was harder for me to handle because there were a lot more trouble makers there.   There were still quite a few very good people too but there were entirely too many who were genuinely bad.   Seven-DwarfsFor a while I was also a sacristan at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst.    At that job I used to have to deal with a wide variety of diocesan priests, professed Religious and parishioners every day of the week.    It was a nice part time job.     I was required to get everything ready for the daily Masses and novenas, as well as weddings, funerals and other things that were required to keep things going at the parish.    That was yet another environment where I was expected to deal with very many eccentric characters.    having lived for most of my life in Lindenhurst I really knew my way around the parish and got along quite well with most of the people.     I’ve never been a good salesman.    In the 1980’s my eighth grade history teacher tried to get me involved with Amway.    That’s a really good job for someone to have if he’s a capable salesman but I simply don’t have the aptitude for that kind of thing.    That kind of job is very good for my teacher and his wife, who’ve always been better than I at dealing with people in that way.     My cousin Gary tried to get me involved with Primerica Financial Services.     Unfortunately even though we attended all the meetings and classes, and did well on the tests we were required to take,  it didn’t work out for us.   I consider it quite a worthwhile experience though.    It’s always good to know as much as possible about insurance and the financial world.

happy fortieth birthday to me

On September 16, 1999, I turned forty years old.    It was nine days before my father’s sixty sixth birthday.    At the time I was working in the customer service department at Citicorp Retail Services on Old Country Road in Melville, New York.    I was also a part time student at Adelphi University in South Huntington.    My parents appeared not to have bothered to make any plans for a significant party for me.   My big day came and went without any significant attention beyond a perfunctory cake, cards and presents.   Something happened, though, that should have struck me as somewhat odd.    All my mother’s relatives from northeastern Pennsylvania came for a visit from out of nowhere.   As a general rule they never bothered to show up for just any birthday or average occasion.    That alone should have made me quite suspicious.   Since my parents , and relatives in general, had always been quite the colorful characters, though, I just took it for granted that it was yet another of their offbeat moments.    Aunt Mary Theresa, Uncle Frankie and Fran were there, as well as Aunt Lauren, Uncle Jim, Noreen, Michelle and Doug.    During the time between my birthday and my father’s my parents kept trying to convince me make plans to go bowling with my cousin Larry.      My cousins Larry, Gary, Joe and I were on a bowling league, for many years,  with the Knights of Columbus’  St. Jane Frances de Chantal council in Wantagh.    On the morning of  my father’s birthday Larry called and we made arrangements to go to a local bowling alley.    That day there was something going on at Immaculate Conception Diocesan Seminary in Lloyd Harbor and I really wanted to go.    It was quite a good thing that I chose to go with Larry though.   We had bowled a few games when his wife Rose called claiming that her car had broken down in the neighborhood of Katie Daly’s, an exceptionally nice Irish restuaurant on Merrick Road in Massapequa.   Larry and I got into our cars and drove to the restaurant.    We pulled into the parking lot, walked into the restaurant and it turned out to be such an exceptionally nice surprise party for me.    After a nice big meal there we all went back to the house and kept things going for the rest of the night.   Perhaps I should have known, throughout the entire week, that something must, by definition, have been going on but sometimes I can overlook the obvious.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/14/daily-prompt-brilliant-disguise/

poor way with words

In the early 1990’s I was working at Citicorp Retail Services, in the Sales Processing department, on Route 109 in Farmingdale, New York.   Eventually we moved to Old Country Road in Melville, New York.     My immediate supervisors were named Carole and Yolanda.   All the people in that department were really good and likable.   I enjoyed working with them.    During the time we were still in Farmingdale Yolanda’s husband  Stanley died.     We all went to Stanley’s wake.    Unfortunately one day while at work, only  a fairly short time after Stanley’s death-it wasn’t any more than a few months later-something came up and I made a casual  flippant remark about death.   It was an otherwise entirely harmless thing and under much better circumstances no one would have even bothered to think twice about it.   Because of Stanley’s recent death, though, Yolanda’s feelings were badly hurt.   She was visibly shaken.    The other people in the department told me that I never should have said such a thing.     Fortunately it didn’t put any permanent strain on my relationship with either Yolanda or anyone else in the department.    I felt truly bad for quite a while afterward though.    I’ve always been a bit hypersensitive anyway and have never been able to handle being subjected to any extra strain.   Another character defect of mine is the fact that I’ve always been prone toward saying things without first considering the context of the circumstances and how people may be counted on to react.   That time, because of my having inadvertently said something that dealt with such a very personal matter, it led to a lot of trouble.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/daily-prompt-careless-whisper/