“Mansfield Park”

bookworm

If there’s one thing in this world that I’ve been smitten with permanently, from the very first second, it’s  book stores.    For as long as I can remember I’ve always been quite a compulsive bookworm.   I can’t remember my very first specific trip to a book store but I’ve always thoroughly enjoyed that environment.  borders1When I was still living in Lindenhurst, I frequently went to the Barnes and Noble at one of the local shopping centers on Sunrise Highway in Massapequa, and the Borders at a shopping center on Route 11o in Farmingdale.    Then when I lived in Wyoming, I spent a lot of time at one of the Barnes and Nobles in Wilkes Barre too.    The one in the Hub was much easier to get to than the one on Main Street.    I ended up absolutely desperately needing a discount card for each store because of my having always compulsively bought books there.   Unfortunately Borders went bankrupt and closed down a few years ago.   I’ve always considered it the best of book stores.   It’s especially nice to know that each book stores now has a little concession stand in it where a customer can relax and get coffee or something to eat.   The only catch is that they always seem to be Starbucks, a company I’ve never liked.     For quite a while at the Wilkes Barre Barnes and Noble I went there, usually on Sundays, to check out their video department so I can get some interesting DVD’s.     Besides that, though, I made sure I also got very many books.   Having majored in literature, in college, I really like to make sure I pay very close attention when I go to a book store, in order to try to find any really interesting things to read.   It’s hard to find obscure things in just any book store, even the very best of them.   Borders always seemed to have the best selection of obscure reading material.    One weekend, a few months ago, Mary Anne, Steve and I spent a  couple of days in Manhattan.   On the first day Mary Anne and Joel were at a meeting for quite a while.   In order to keep busy I went to the nearby Barnes and Noble that’s affiliated with New York University.   Because it’s a college book store I was quite favorably impressed with their selection.   If I ever lived closer to there, I’d be at that store constantly.    I’m also on the mailing lists of a few Catholic book publishers.   That’s another way for me to keep aware of all sorts of obscure writers.   Because of my educational discipline, and my interest in Catholicism and western culture, I have all sorts of interests and always try to find the collected works of quite a wide varieties of authors.   It’s hard to track them down, though, in the average book store.   Lately I often read things online.    Right now I’m  re reading Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” on a literature site.    In a way it’s just as good as reading a real book but it’s just not the same.   There’s nothing so interesting as being able to visit a real book store and to buy a real book.

http://cxianliu.wordpress.com/2014/04/03/taipei-a-mesmerizing-city/

http://itsmatthewburgos.wordpress.com/2014/05/17/notebook-or-journal-daily-prompt/

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/first-sight/

http://vnaimages.wordpress.com/2014/05/17/daily-prompt-first-sight-the-mallard-duck/

http://criticaldispatches.com/2013/10/18/disturbing-moments-in-animated-cartoon-history/

http://ambitiousdrifter.wordpress.com/2014/05/17/daily-prompt-cats-connect/

Annunci

dear sir or madame would you read my book?

Ever since I was still only a little kid, I’ve always been quite the compulsive bookworm.    When my parents, Mary Anne and I used to go back and forth to northeastern Pennsylvania regularly to visit relatives, I spent each entire trip reading billboards and other signs along the way.   I can still remember being quite mesmerized over what Cutty Sark could possibly have meant.    Whenever I ate or drank something I paid quite an inordinate amount of attention to abbreviations like oz. and lb. on the labels.    In school I developed quite a reputation for having won virtually every spelling bee in Queens and Suffolk County.    I was the kind of kid whom my teachers, on standardized tests, always gave credit for having been around five years above the average reading level for my age range.    I can remember having read, at St. Gabriel’s and the local East Elmhurst Public Library, books and stories like “The Five Chinese Brothers”, “Skeeter Chariot High In the Sky” and the collected works of Dr. Seuss.   I first heard of Edward Lear at St. Gabriel’s, when I read his “There Was an Old Man With a Beard..” poem.    In the sixth grade, Brother Thomas made my classmates and me read, among other literary works, Steven Crane’s “The Red Badge of Courage”, and Edward Arlington Robinson’s “Richard Corey” and “Miniver Cheevey”.     Throughout my days at St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School and Farmingdale College, I was exposed to F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Shakespeare, Keats, Yeats, Blake, Joyce and countless other writers.    The Beatles, and other singers and bands from their era,  have always been my musical favorites.    The songs of the 1960’s reflect quite a lot of classic literary influence.   Joan Baez’ “So We’ll Go No More A-Roving” is based on Byron’s poem.    Yoko Ono’s “Who Has Seen the Wind” is based on Christina Rossetti’s poem.   The Beatles’ “I Am the Walrus” and Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” come right out of Lewis Carroll.   I’ve heard that  Pete Seeger’s “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”  was derived from an old medieval or Elizabethan poem.    As with my taste in show business and pop culture, I tend to be a bit of a literary snob.    The majority of the writers who really interest me are from the distant past.  Because of my pathological aversion to change-I’m ever the stick in the mud-my reaction to someone’s “We need another Emily Dickinson or Robert Frost” would be quite a resounding “Whatever good would that do? We already have the real Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost”.   When someone else has nothing to do he may eat, read the sports page. or watch television.   When I have nothing to do I read the collected works of the Brownings, Brontes or Shelleys, or some other classic author.    Right now I’m reading Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park”.    I have to be careful though.   Once I tried to read  seventy five pages James Joyce’s  “Ulysses” over the course of a day.   I got an unbearable migraine that lasted for three days.     I always have to laugh when I’m in a book store and see books by and about everyone from Tim Conway to Suzanne Somers.    I enjoy all kinds of reading material, ranging from biography to poems, novels, philosophy and theology.   Because of my having always been smitten with the humanities, people often take it for granted that I majored in theology and philosophy in school.    As a lay Carmelite I really have to keep up with developments in Sanjuanist and Teresian theology.     Sometimes I feel as if I don’t fit in very well with a lot of the people I’m expected to associate with but you never know when my interest in classic literature can come in quite handy.    On New Year’s Eve Steve an I went to a party in the neighborhood.    Although everyone else there, unlike me, was married with children and enjoyed sports,  I ended up getting into a really interesting conversation, with a guy named Kirk, about the collected works of Flannery O’Connor.    Not many people could have kept up with someone who wanted to talk about her.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/24/writing-challenge-reflections/#more-71506

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