history

Northeastern Pennsylvania In History

leg-up-jhc

It’s the Fourth of July in northeastern Pennsylvania.  Naturally I’m partying with kin in Hilldale.  A gang of cousins and I go to nearby Wilkes~Barre to see the historical exhibitions in the Square.

 

 

“Northeastern Pa.’s loaded with military history,”  Joe and Ron, our Viet Nam veteran cousins, remind us.  “Remember,” Ron said. “We have to leave soon to see Queen Esther’s Bloody Rock in Wyoming Borough.”

 

 

At the end of our day, we get to go to Jitty Joe’s, in Scranton, for ice cream.  That’s all so mundane, even with all the toppings, compared to what we see here. 

 

 

Yet again welcome back to Rochelle’s  Friday Fictioneers.  J. Hardy Carroll provides this week’s photograph.  For the information of those of you with an interest in northeastern PA/Wyoming Valley history, here’s a good link:    Queen Esther’s Bloody Rock

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It’s Deja Vu’ All Over Again

venice-fatima

Ralph and Gertrude were enjoying a leisurely stroll by their favorite spot. 

 

“It’s too bad we can never get your brother to join us,” she complained.

 

Yeah,” he admitted. “Sam’s plum terrified of water. Once when we were growing up, I asked him why. He explained that long ago he was on a large  unsinkable ship that hit an iceberg. Next thing he knew, he was stranded someplace and told to wait for another family to come and get him.”

 

“Sam was born on April 15, 1972. The Titanic sank on April 15, 1912.  Do you think there may be something to it?”

Welcome back yet again to ROCHELLE’S Friday Fictioneers.  Read all about it on her site. Fatima Fakier Deria graces us with the week’s photo.

Maltese Carmelites

malta

Brother John and Brother Titus are in charge of organizing tourists’ visits to the Discalced Carmelites’ Church and Priory of the Annunciation.

 

 

People attend Mass and pray the Rosary and Liturgy of the Hours daily with the Friars. Tourists are inevitably smitten with the beautiful Baroque architecture. Visitors often participate in college level courses given by the Carmelite Institute.

 

“Well, John,” Brother Titus stated, “I especially enjoy the fact that people can’t seem to get enough out of our telling them about the abuse we took here during Robespierre’s Reign of Terror, and all our history, theology, and philosophy, in general.”

 

“Yes,” his friend agreed. “After his time here, each guest will go back to his daily life and vocation with a better insight into things. Our vocation’s not for just anyone but it’s really a fine way to live.”

 

The pair listened joyously to the car doors slamming outside.

 

This week’s What Pegman Saw  takes us to Mdina in Malta. When I found out that they have a Carmelite church and priory there, I couldn’t help taking advantage of it.

Major Third World Troubles

nigeria

“I’ve been talking to Fraser, the history professor, and to Father Anthony, who’s from here,” Trevor reminded Raquel. 

 

“Perfect!” his wife gushed. “Each one has a bottomless pit of knowledge of this part of Africa. That’s a perfect way to keep people’s interest. One is an expert on the didactic side and the other on the narrative side.”

 

 

“The number of people living in utter poverty grew from fifty one million in 1990 to eighty six million in 2013. Along with that we can talk about the Civil war between Nigeria and Biafra between July of ’67 and January, ’70.”

 

“There’s one catch,” Trevor reminded her. “Considering that we’re asking for help with getting people jobs, health care, and education, it might be to our advantage to set the film in a less idyllic places. Imagery makes a difference.

 

The couple then proceeded to make the necessary phone calls.

 

Welcome back, yet again to What Pegman Saw , a weekly prompt based upon a Google geographic location.  Fraser and Fr. Anthony are real people. 

 

 

The Lost Generation

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“You know, honey,” Basil told Myrtle, “People only remember World War One from Fred Mertz’s “Inky Dinky Parlez Vous” and Snoopy’s adventures as a flying ace.”

“Yes, I know,” his wife complained. “Hitler happened because of Germany’s resentment of the Versailles Treaty. Unexploded bombs from the war will be capable of going off for the next eight centuries.”

“Those two facts are connected,” he reminded her. 

In his backpack he was carrying copies of Remarque’s “All’s Quiet On the Western Front” and Carl Sandburg’s “Grass.”

“Let’s go get some coffee,” she suggested as they continued on their way. 

 

Thank you to Rochelle Wisoff~Fields for guiding us weekly in Friday Fictioneers , and please read the links for all the details. This week’s photo prompt was provided by Sandra Crook.

 

Please also see “All’s Quiet On the Western Front” , and “Grass” for some further insight into the war.

Franz and Franz~What Pegman Saw

hotelimperial“Yes, honey, I understand that the Czech Republic is quite beautiful,” Gracie admitted to George, “but of  all the places we could have visited with our lottery winnings, why come here to Karlovy Vary?!”

“Think of all the history that’s here,” her husband reminded her. Austria Hungary’s Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were from here.  He’s the only assassinated public figure with both a band and a beer named after him.

“Besides that,” he continued, “Franz Kafka’s from here too. You know how many times I’ve read everything of his, from “The Metamorphosis” to “Amerika.”

“And best of all,” she intoned happily. “Blanche and Harry will be insanely jealous when they see our videos of the Hotel Imperial.”

“With all the beauty this place has going for it,” he sighed, “is that all you can think of?”

“Hey, honey pie, I’m a nudge. Get over it,” she bragged triumphantly.

This is my very first attempt at a story for Pegman.  Visit the Czech Republic’s Karlovy Vary and write a story based upon one of the photographs. Keep it within 150 words.

What Pegman Saw

Well it’s one, two, three what are we fightin’ for?

“Have you read the Washington Post’s article on the fiftieth anniversary of the Tet Offensive?” Stanley asked Yolanda.

His friend asked for a head start, not having read it yet.

“On this day in 1968,” he explained, “The Viet Cong launched a series of  attacks on South Vietnam, that lasted until September 23rd.”

“It was one of the war’s largest military campaigns.”

“Yeah,” she admitted. “William Calley’s My Lai Massacre was on March 16th that year too.”

“That’s why I always  give to organizations like the American Legion,” he reminded her. “Hey, you never know where these guys have been.”

stumpsWelcome to Friday Fictioneers, where Rochelle Wisoff~Fields leads us in our weekly attempt to write a story based upon a photo prompt. Rochelle supplied this week’s photo prompt.

St. Edith, Rosa, and Blessed Titus

“This time of year is heavy for a history major, you know,” Stanley told Yolanda.

“Why?” she wanted to know.

“January 27 is the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz,” he explained. “St. Edith Stein and her sister, Rosa, both Carmelites, died there. Blessed Titus Brandsma, another Carmelite, died at Dachau.”

“They’re my favorite Carmelites,” Yolanda reminded him. “The Steins died because they were Jews and Titus died because of his outspoken defiance of the Nazis.”

They both stood motionless for a seemingly endless few moments in the bitter cold. Then the couple walked away quietly, clutching textbooks.

Please join us as Rochelle Wisoff~Fields, each week, guides us through Friday Fictioneers, a collection of hundred~word stories. This week’s photograph was supplied by Sandra Crook.