Amway

heigh ho heigh ho it’s off to work we go

Unfortunately I’m between jobs right now.    My last two jobs were one with Citicorp Retail Services and one with the postal service in Melville and Bethpage.    I could never stand the postal job because it was so physically hard and strenuous but at least it was something.     The work was very boring and required a lot of heavy lifting.    Many of the people there were hard to get along with but that’s a part of any job.    My circumstances in Bethpage were especially difficult to handle because I was often forced to work the graveyard shift there.    Most of the people in management were at least reasonably decent and easy to get along with.    The only one who was a troublemaker was Marjorie, a surly black woman.     There was a union there but I never got significantly involved with it.   Of all the people I knew, Kevin and Anton were the most significant union officials.     The one advantage to my having worked there was that I got a chance to meet a lot of very interesting characters.    Before that I worke at Citicorp Retail Services in Farmingdale and Melville.    In the first department I was in, Sales Processing,  from the late 1980’s until the early 1990’s,  everything worked out quite well and we all got along quite well.    Sal, Carole and Yolanda were in charge.    Most people there were quite decent and good natured,      Besides the inevitable fighting and personality conflicts it was always quite a happy environment.    Then after a while  that department was eliminated.    I got moved to Customer Service.    That department was harder for me to handle because there were a lot more trouble makers there.   There were still quite a few very good people too but there were entirely too many who were genuinely bad.   Seven-DwarfsFor a while I was also a sacristan at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Lindenhurst.    At that job I used to have to deal with a wide variety of diocesan priests, professed Religious and parishioners every day of the week.    It was a nice part time job.     I was required to get everything ready for the daily Masses and novenas, as well as weddings, funerals and other things that were required to keep things going at the parish.    That was yet another environment where I was expected to deal with very many eccentric characters.    having lived for most of my life in Lindenhurst I really knew my way around the parish and got along quite well with most of the people.     I’ve never been a good salesman.    In the 1980’s my eighth grade history teacher tried to get me involved with Amway.    That’s a really good job for someone to have if he’s a capable salesman but I simply don’t have the aptitude for that kind of thing.    That kind of job is very good for my teacher and his wife, who’ve always been better than I at dealing with people in that way.     My cousin Gary tried to get me involved with Primerica Financial Services.     Unfortunately even though we attended all the meetings and classes, and did well on the tests we were required to take,  it didn’t work out for us.   I consider it quite a worthwhile experience though.    It’s always good to know as much as possible about insurance and the financial world.

Annunci

lefty’s left arm broke

On Wednesday,  November 13,  during the late afternoon I broke my left arm.    It’s always struck me as somewhat interesting that it happened on the grounds of my high school, St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School,  in West Islip, New York, because I was in the class of 1977.    During the late 1980’s and for most of the 1990’s I was very active in the school’s alumni association.    In 1983 my eighth grade history teacher from Our Lady of Perpetual Help Elementary School in Lindenhurst, New York, convinced me to get involved with Amway.    At one of  St. John’s alumni meetings I convinced one of the school’s long-time assistant principals, Sister Noella, to buy some Amway bubble gum remover from me for the tables and desks in the school.   She’d been on the administration for as long as anyone can remember.     During the late afternoon of that fateful Wednesday, after I had arrived home from my job at Citicorp Retail Services in Farmingdale, New York, I drove over to the school so I could deliver the  bubble gum cleaner to Sister Noella.      When I got inside the school I went over to the lobby outside the cafeteria.   Instead of patiently walking to the administration’s office, I tried to run.    Unfortunately I tripped over a bar that went across the floor,  and I fell flat upon my face.    My left arm was broken.   Within the next few minutes I walked to the administration’s office and explained to Sister William Marie about what had happened.    I then walked over to Good Samaritan Hospital, right next d00r.    I couldn’t even sign myself into the hospital because I’m left handed and my right hand is entirely incompetent when it comes to writing.    They made me scribble something anyway.   I was forced to stay in the emergency room for quite an obscenely long time without any attention.    Eventually  I was treated by Dr. Glen Arvin and his nurse Terry.    My mother, and my cousin Larry from Massapequa, arrived to take me home after I was already stupefied from all the anesthesia and other medication I was forced to take.    The next morning I explained everything on the phone to Carole, my immediate supervisor at Citicorp.      My shoulder and elbow were broken.   Because of the gravity of that kind of a break everyone took it for granted that I would inevitably require both an operation and a lot of physical therapy.    Throughout the next few months I couldn’t drive and I was subjected to a lot of extra boredom and annoyance.    I tried to learn to write with my right hand but that led to nothing but trouble and frustration.    With lots of help from other people, though, I got through it all quite well.   I never needed physical therapy or an operation.    I went to a physician’s assistant a few times for check-ups.  When the big day finally came, and my father drove me to the physician’s assistant one last time to have my cast taken off,  I practically passed out because of the weird sensation I was subjected to when it was first removed.   Other than that, though,  most of the immediate aftermath of my broken arm was only  relatively minor.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/04/daily-prompt-against-all-odds/