literature

Art Imitates Life

“I’ve always really liked those flowers,” Blaise told Ansgar.  “They remind me of my favorite Robert Frost poem, ‘Asking For Roses’. 

“Of course,” his friend reminded him, “He has another one too, ‘The Rose Family’, that’s quite relevant here.”

“Ha, Amateur!” the former went on. “I can top that. What about Robert Burns’ ‘My Love Is Like A Red Red Rose’?

Just then their wives showed up.  “Don’t go so crazy.  You know perfectly well those flowers aren’t even real,” Clarabelle reminded them.

“Hey, so who cares?” Edna explained.  These guys are always reciting works of fiction anway.”

Once again it’s time for Rochelle’s Friday Fictioneers.   This week she has supplied the photo prompt, so I don’t have to put another link here.  We all so hope you enjoy our works of fiction.

gold-tipped-anniversary-rose

Annunci

The Browning Version..A Poetry Recital

the-met-roger-b

It was April 6, 1889, in Victoria’s England. Robert Browning, aged 76, was attending a party hosted by artist Rudolf Lehmann.

 

Colonel Gouraud brought out an Edison Talking Machine. At the company’s behest, Browning began reciting his poem, “How They Brought the Good News From Ghent To Aix”, but his memory lapsed.

 

“I’m sorry,” he stated. “I can’t remember me own verses, but one thing that I shall remember all me life is the astonishing…by your wonderful invention.”

 

He died on December 12 that year at the home of his son . Browning was the first poet whose voice was recorded for posterity.

 

Robert Browning 

 

 

The photo prompt was provided by Roger Bultot.  As always, Rochelle guides us weekly through Friday Fictioneers.

 

 

A Faerie Tale

mt-lemmon-with-tree

“You’re taking quite a gamble,” Elzo reminded Ennio. “It’s never a wise move to follow the Pipes of Pan.”

 

“Quite true, Old Bean!” his friend admitted. “It would be wise to beware, while we’re here, all the unicorns, rainbows, and banshees, among other risks.”

 

“That’s true metaphorically too,” the former continued. “Everyone knows that Keats’ ‘La Belle Dame Sans Merci’ wasn’t really just a lovely faerie nymphomaniac, but that she was a symbol of an obsession of his.”

 

“We can relax here for a while and go home better able to deal with life’s unicorns, rainbows, and banshees.”

 

Welcome back yet again to Friday Fictioneers where Rochelle leads us weekly through our hundred~word story. This week her husband Jan W. Fields has supplied the photo prompt.

 

 

Irrevocable Transformation

Humpty Dumpty’s a metaphor

 

Fallen from the wall

 

Past is gone forevermore

 

No return at all.

 

Adam and Eve’s Apple 

 

Imagined as an egg

 

Pandora’s Box, of course,

 

Works just as well.

 

I’ll see you soon.

 

Between now and then

 

Think of some more.

 

 

It’s time yet again for DVerse Poets Pub

 

Today’s Quadrille #53 is a 44~word poem, written by each of us, including the word “egg”.  Kim is our Fearless Leader.

 

 

 

 

 

art and life

Ralph was to be married in a few days. To help him relax, his best man Sam took him to his favorite hangout so they could read poetry for a while.

They found the Norton Anthology of Victorian Poems and began reading.

First they read Tennyson’s “Locksley Hall”, a tale of a soldier jilted by his old girlfriend, now a wife and mother, whose parents can’t stand him. Throughout the poem he wallows in bitterness.

They then turned to Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess”. The Duke’s widowhood was self-inflicted.

“Is it always this way?” Ralph asked, anxiously pondering his decision.

This week’s photo prompt was provided by J. Hardy Carroll. Friday Fictioneers is our weekly attempt at writing a one hundred-word story, with the help of our fearless leader, Rochelle Wisoff~Fields.

classic narrative poetry

A while ago I read a biography of the fourteenth century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer but until recently I’d somehow never read his “Canterbury Tales”.  Considering what a compulsive bookworm I’ve always been, that’s quite a major shock.  Recently I was looking through the book case downstairs in the den and I noticed that there was a copy of his famous classic  narrative chaucerpoem in standard English so I’ve begun reading it.  So far I’m up to the Reeve’s Tale. Often, while reading for a long time, I become unavoidably distracted and my mind wanders.  While reading the poem, I somehow spontaneously started thinking back to an incident involving my old friend Jimmy, when we were kids in our early teens. One day Jimmy and I had nothing better to do so in order to avoid boredom he started cracking corn. He never asked me to help him but, conveniently, I didn’t care. Often, if I let my guard down while reading, I start humming an old song or two. Last night I couldn’t help humming the Beatles’ classic, “Do You Want to Know A Secret?”  My impatience gets me crazy like that but at least I always keep on trying to apply myself as conscientiously as possible to any task. Once I’ve set my mind to something I’m quite the determined character.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/final-trio/

impatient bookworm

For as long as I can remember I’ve always been quite a compulsive bookworm. There’s never been a time when I’ve gone for a significant period without reading something of at least some significance.  I have quite an interest in classic western literature. Currently I’m reading both Jane Austen’s  novel “Sense and Sensibility” and Longfellow’s epic poem “Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie”.  Unfortunately I’ve been a bit lazy about them. Having gone on quite a streak with both for a long while, I somehow stopped reading them a few weeks ago.  I have no idea why. It’s most certainly not because I haven’t been bothering to read anything. Over the course of that time I’ve been reading periodicals and all sorts of little things. evangeline.longfellowPerhaps it’s because both those literary works subject my eyes to such an ominous chore but I simply haven’t yet gone back to either of them.  I’m now reading both online and they’re so long and difficult. Unfortunately when this happens I sometimes don’t even bother to end up finishing what I’ve been reading.  Impatience has always been quite an exceptionally bad problem for me. I intend to continue with them though. I’ve already read “Sense and Sensibility” a few times anyway. Throughout my lifetime I shall always read constantly. As with everything else I do, though, there will be rough spots.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/readers-block/

http://movingtowardsthelight.com/2014/10/12/book-review/

http://guthonestfaith.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/letter-snob/

http://likereadingontrains.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/a-teen-demigod-and-the-greek-pantheon-daily-prompt-readers-block/

http://anupturnedsoul.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/you-dont-read-me-the-way-that-you-used-to/

http://polyproticamory.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/im-a-terrible-bookworm/

literature major me

I’d say that I enjoy both fiction and non-fiction about the same, though for different reasons.  Right now I’m reading Longfellow’s poem, “Evangeline” and Jane Austen’s novel, “Sense and Sensibility”. I’m also reading “The Story Of A Soul” by St. Therese of Lisieux.  I’ve always been interested in novels and poems because they allow me to travel to other places and time frames.  I can permit my imagination to get entirely out of control. A well written novel or poem also can teach interesting lessons about human nature. Dostoyevsky’s  “The Brothers Karamazov” and Evelyn Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited” are exceptionally good examples of this. One problem with Dostoyevsky, though, is that he tends to be exceptionally didactic. Reading something of his always makes me feel as if it’s written in the form of a thinly disguised theology and philosophy lecture.nortonI’ve always enjoyed seeing how many different symbols I can see in various works of literature.  Two of the most famous examples of symbolism in classic western literature are a bookworm character, who reads a story within the story,  a convention begun by Cervantes in “Don Quijote”, and travel, begun by St. Augustine of Hippo in his “Confessions”.  Among works of non-fiction, I especially enjoy biographies, and classic works of theology and philosophy. By now I’ve read very many biographies of a wide variety of famous people, including writers, politicians, musicians and saints. Although I only have thirteen credits in philosophy, and no college credits in theology, I’ve always had quite a voracious interest in those fields. As a lay Carmelite I’ve read all the Carmelite classics I’ve been able to find.  Since I really like to get involved in a good debate about the culture war, reading these kinds of things keeps me well informed.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/the-great-divide/

http://lindaswritingblog.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/fiction/

http://tyrocharm.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/longest-reading-queue-purely-for-fun/

http://laughagain.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/fact-or-fiction/

http://berryduchess.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/the-bibliophile-in-me/

http://thegadabouttown.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/fact-or-not-fact/

brideshead revisited revisited

If I could have a lot of time available to visit my collection of reading material, and to pick one book which I should absolutely have to read before all the others, it would be quite a very difficult decision.    I always seem to wander back to Emily Bronte’s “Wuthering Heights”,  Dostoyevsky’s “The Brothers Karamazov” and Evelyn Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited”, as well as a few others.    Perhaps I should choose “Brideshead Revisited”.     It opens in 1922 and tells the tale of the Flyte, an aristocratic English Catholic family.   It begins with Charles as a new freshman at Oxford with all his eccentric friends.     The novel then goes on to relate the story of all the dysfunctional relationships, both familial and marital, that exist within the family or Lord and Lady Marchmain.   It tackles intensely serious problems in a somewhat seemingly lighthearted manner.    Everyone in the story is deeply morally flawed, especially those characters who are the most significantly aligned with the Faith.   As in real life, the novel shows beauty as well as ugliness and sorrow.   There are all kinds of reaction to the Faith, from the agnostic narrator Charles to the devout Lady Marchmain;  Lord Marchmain, who grudgingly became Catholic in order to marry her;  and the hopelessly befuddled Protestant Rex Mottram, Julia’s husband.    Rex and Julia want to marry, but he’s Protestant, has had an affair and has already been married.    The scene relates a serious problem in a seemingly relatively lighthearted way.    Unlike the intense style of Dostoyevsky, Waugh depicts such dilemmas with wit and makes his characters appear even a bit toward the silly side.     Considering what a profound and significant topic the book deals with it takes quite a humorous approach to things.   Catholicism is ultimately exactly like that anyway, with dimensions that appear a bit Mother Goose-ish but that are ultimately about very hard facts.    The novel deals with all dimensions of society, including fear and resentment of the other, class consciousness and mankind’s ultimate end.       

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/off-the-shelf/

http://davidfetzer6271951.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/off-the-shelf/

http://tuckedintoacorner.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/the-reading-corner/

http://dossiersofsbk.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/off-the-shelf/

 

 

 

 

the classic literary fairy

I’ve always been quite a literary snob.   Although I realize that every pop cultural figure, ranging from Joan Collins’s sister Jackie to Suzanne Sommers, and people from the casts of television shows like “Friends”, thinks he’s a writer, I inevitably restrict my reading material to the works of people like Dostoyevsky and Jane Austen, Flannery O’Connor and Walker Percy, and all the other highbrow literary figures.     Were I ever confronted with a literary fairy, who could give me the ability to become either an obscure novelist, whose work would be admired and studied by a small cult following for generations yet to come, or a popular paperback author whose works could provide immediate enjoyment to millions in the short term, I should choose to be a serious author.  There’s nothing wrong with writing harmless fluff with no literary merit.   I’ve simply always admired important literature and wished that I were capable of writing something truly profound and noteworthy.   I don’t like having to be bothered with keeping up with trends, though several trends, throughout the past few generations, have most certainly caught my attention quite favorably.    Great literature, like all the other disciplines in the humanities department, deals with human nature and a good author has to have the ability to have a lot of insight into history, psychology, philosophy and all other disciplines.    If I were ever lucky enough to be a serious writer, I should make sure I should steer clear of all liberal ideas.   Story telling is extremely important and the conservative voice has to be heard.     That’s why I’ve always liked both music and literature.     Politics, history, economics and other disciplines have their place in society but people tend to be more prone toward accepting ideas by way of the narrative approach rather than didactic.    I should think that maybe I could be a serious intelligent alternative to the kind of pablum that comes from writers like J. K. Rowling.    Even if my work would be admired and studied by only few people, as the object of a cult following, I should be quite happy with that, as long as I could write exceptionally good literature.    That would be especially appropriate for someone like me, considering that I’ve always been quite a distinctive character who can be counted on to appeal only to people with seriously offbeat tastes and ideas anyway.   I’ve always enjoyed Emily Dickinson’s idea, that one should “Tell all the truth but tell it slant.”    Symbolism, an important ingredient in all literature, plays quite an exceptionally large role in my world.   Since I’ve never felt particularly comfortable in the company of strangers, I should have to be the kind of writer who would remain aloof from his readership.    Frequent interviews and constant attention would be quite a burden for me to have to contend with.    If anyone is interested in finding out about the other worlds that come from my imagination, though, he’d better most certainly beware of all the twists and turns they contain.   Some of them can be awfully seriously disturbing.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/a-bookish-choice/

http://likereadingontrains.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/i-am-the-obscure-daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://tnkerr.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://joantatley.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/literary-witching/