those darn transcendentals

Officially, true beauty-the kind Plato, Socrates, Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas referred to, is quite an objective concept.  John Keats, in his “Ode on A Grecian Urn”, and Emily Dickinson, in her “I Died For Beauty,” wrongly see beauty and truth as synonymous.  Of the three transcendentals, beauty, truth and goodness, all are based on an objective standard.  but it’s understandable that one could see them from a subjective point of view.  I recently read something in an article in Communio Magazine, that said that St. Thomas argued that it was very important to recognize truth’s subjective dimension.  In its everyday usage, of course, “beauty”, outside a theology or humanities classroom, is an undeniably subjective concept.  As long as that’s understood, it’s quite nice for different individuals and groups to have differing standards of what strikes them as appealing. Since I’ve always been quite obsessively interested in the humanities, this is such an interesting concept for me.  Man’s understanding of a rightly ordered relationship among the transcendentals has quite dire consequences morally and ethically.  A people who admire and respect ugliness in art will also admire ugliness in life in general. They will see the false as true and the evil as good.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/absolute-beauty/

http://basicallybeyondbasic.com/2014/09/16/daily-prompt-absolute-beauty/

http://anawnimiss.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/of-an-old-book/

http://lifeconfusions.wordpress.com/2014/09/16/beauty/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s