the classic literary fairy

I’ve always been quite a literary snob.   Although I realize that every pop cultural figure, ranging from Joan Collins’s sister Jackie to Suzanne Sommers, and people from the casts of television shows like “Friends”, thinks he’s a writer, I inevitably restrict my reading material to the works of people like Dostoyevsky and Jane Austen, Flannery O’Connor and Walker Percy, and all the other highbrow literary figures.     Were I ever confronted with a literary fairy, who could give me the ability to become either an obscure novelist, whose work would be admired and studied by a small cult following for generations yet to come, or a popular paperback author whose works could provide immediate enjoyment to millions in the short term, I should choose to be a serious author.  There’s nothing wrong with writing harmless fluff with no literary merit.   I’ve simply always admired important literature and wished that I were capable of writing something truly profound and noteworthy.   I don’t like having to be bothered with keeping up with trends, though several trends, throughout the past few generations, have most certainly caught my attention quite favorably.    Great literature, like all the other disciplines in the humanities department, deals with human nature and a good author has to have the ability to have a lot of insight into history, psychology, philosophy and all other disciplines.    If I were ever lucky enough to be a serious writer, I should make sure I should steer clear of all liberal ideas.   Story telling is extremely important and the conservative voice has to be heard.     That’s why I’ve always liked both music and literature.     Politics, history, economics and other disciplines have their place in society but people tend to be more prone toward accepting ideas by way of the narrative approach rather than didactic.    I should think that maybe I could be a serious intelligent alternative to the kind of pablum that comes from writers like J. K. Rowling.    Even if my work would be admired and studied by only few people, as the object of a cult following, I should be quite happy with that, as long as I could write exceptionally good literature.    That would be especially appropriate for someone like me, considering that I’ve always been quite a distinctive character who can be counted on to appeal only to people with seriously offbeat tastes and ideas anyway.   I’ve always enjoyed Emily Dickinson’s idea, that one should “Tell all the truth but tell it slant.”    Symbolism, an important ingredient in all literature, plays quite an exceptionally large role in my world.   Since I’ve never felt particularly comfortable in the company of strangers, I should have to be the kind of writer who would remain aloof from his readership.    Frequent interviews and constant attention would be quite a burden for me to have to contend with.    If anyone is interested in finding out about the other worlds that come from my imagination, though, he’d better most certainly beware of all the twists and turns they contain.   Some of them can be awfully seriously disturbing.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/a-bookish-choice/

http://likereadingontrains.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/i-am-the-obscure-daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://tnkerr.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/daily-prompt-a-bookish-choice/

http://joantatley.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/literary-witching/

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