eight is enough

Of course if I were ever to have the absolutely ultimate party, I should have to invite Beatles John Winston Lennon and James Paul McCartney to represent my favorite band.     It would be only right to make them sit next to each other.    Their combined intelligence and creativity as well as wit, humor and imagination would be bound inevitably to provide one and all with quite a fine time.   If I allow them to sit right next to Lewis Carroll, that would really make for such an interesting collection of insights.   Everyone knows how intensely significant an influence Carroll always was on the 1960’s musical world.     The threesome could take us on all sorts of misadventures throughout both Pepperland and Wonderland.    Woody Allen would be quite an exceptionally interesting guest too.    He and I are both neurotic bespectacled native New Yorkers.     We also share an interest in dwelling upon mankind’s much bigger, more significant questions about the ultimate meaning of life and death.    We most certainly don’t have any of the same answers, though, unfortunately.     Perhaps I should be more comfortable in the company of the typical character Allen played in his movies than with the real Allen.      Each of the characters he played is quite a perpetually befuddled eternal square stranded in a world that’s utterly over his head.    There’s a side of me that’s very much like that.    An accomplished jazz clarinetist, he, along with Lennon and McCartney, could provide quite a show.     In order to ensure that there will be women in attendance I could invite Emily Dickinson, Jane Austen and Flannery O’Connor.     Austen could give our festivities a bit of a sense of propriety and a dose of what life was like during England’s Regency period.   She was known for her having been supposedly quite stuffy but I’ll bet she could really cut a rug.    The Misses Dickinson and O’Connor, by explaining to us all exactly what was going on in their perpetually lopsided literary works,  could give us all sorts of insights into human nature.    Dickinson was quite the dysfunctional recluse, and O’Connor a strict orthodox Catholic, but I should assume each of them could swing from the occasional chandelier or two every once in a while too.     The last name on my guest list would be Robert F. Kennedy, brother of the thirty fifth president.     R.F.K. has the distinction of being the most interesting of all the famous people I’ve met in person.   I met him at his last St. Patrick’s Day Parade, a few months before he died.    I was only in the third grade then.    Kennedy also was quite charming, witty, intelligent and articulate.    He could explain just exactly what it is about the Kennedy mystique that has always kept people so enraptured throughout the course of the past few generations.    A consummate politician and statesman, he could also be an effective moderator among the others.   

 

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/seat-guru/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/07/12/hanging-out-with-the-cool-crow-dude/#comment-13639

http://guthonestfaith.wordpress.com/2014/07/13/the-living-dead/

http://abozdar.wordpress.com/2014/07/12/tryst/

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